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Black Gate 4

A New Anthology

You might not have noticed, but we don't see a whole lot of Moslem protagonists in science fiction and fantasy.

A recent collection assembled by Muhammad Aurangzeb Ahmad and Ahmed A. Khan sought to address that very problem with twelve stories, including a reprint of a Dabir and Asim story from yours truly.

Too often our science fiction and fantasy is informed only by western outlooks, and it's about time somebody made a collection like this available. I have my fingers crossed that it's the first of many -- the editors, though, need readers, so I hope you'll try it out!

Here's the Kindle link:

http://www.amazon.com/A-Mosque-Among-the-Stars/dp/B0027P87LU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1240829292&sr=8-1


Comments

I was alluding to Mark Steyn and MacLean's trouble due to their support and reproduction of the Danish cartoons. And I stick by my earlier remark in this respect. If there is another issue with them, then it looks like getting into trouble is becoming habitual to them.

Now let us go back to your earlier post:

1) You talk about Muslim antagonists. I can point out several novels that have Muslim antagonists. Now here is a challenge for you. Show me one story or novel, written originally in English, that depicts a Muslim protagonist.

2) You also talk about future war between the Western civilization and Islam. First, a civilization is a state of society and society is composed of individuals. With the number of Muslims living in the West, Islam is one of the several components of the Western civilization. As such your sweeping generalization makes no sense. If you had mentioned war between the West and, say, Iraq, or war between the West and the Taliban, it would make more semantic sense.
I was alluding to Mark Steyn and MacLean's trouble due to their support and reproduction of the Danish cartoons. And I stick by my earlier remark in this respect. If there is another issue with them, then it looks like getting into trouble is becoming habitual to them.

It looks like standing on their rights as free human beings is "habitual to them." It was ultimately the Canadian Human Rights Commissions, not they, who "got into trouble" as a result of the illegitimate attempt to suppress their rights, because this alerted freedom-loving Canadians to the danger posed by the Commissions.

No people have the "right" to not be offended by criticism, or even mockery, of any ideology they hold, be it religious or secular. Thankfully, in America the First Amendment protects us from those who would try to get people "into trouble" for speaking freely.

Now here is a challenge for you. Show me one story or novel, written originally in English, that depicts a Muslim protagonist.

Sarah Zietel, Fool's War. And this in a future history in which the "clash of civilizations" happened long ago, and the Muslims decisively lost, were nearly wiped out, and became a persecuted people forced into diaspora by the conquest of the Middle East.

2) You also talk about future war between the Western civilization and Islam. First, a civilization is a state of society and society is composed of individuals. With the number of Muslims living in the West, Islam is one of the several components of the Western civilization. As such your sweeping generalization makes no sense. If you had mentioned war between the West and, say, Iraq, or war between the West and the Taliban, it would make more semantic sense.

There have been many inter-civilizational wars in the past, there will be many in the future. The series of jihads by which Islam originally brought the Mideast and many regions around under its domination were among the purest examples of inter-civilizational wars in history. Your pathetic attempt to play with definitions doesn't alter the realities involved.